About the writers:

 

View past festival programmes:

Edna O'Brien

 

Readings & Events

Tickets available to purchase in the lobby of Triskel Arts Centre. Credit cards accepted.

Admission may be blocked after an event begins. Refunds will be
given only if an event is cancelled.

 

Go to events on: Tuesday * Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday

Download a PDF copy of the 2015 festival brochure.

 

 

TUESDAY

 

Book launch: The Berries
with Billy O'Callaghan and Doireann Ní Ghríofa

The Berries

22 September at 3pm
Hollyhill Library, Cork
Admission: FREE

 

 

All are welcome to the launch of The Berries, a book of stories, poems and photography inspired by the people and place of Hollyhill, commissioned by Cork City Council and the Munster Literature Centre. Contributors include Cork writers Billy O'Callaghan, William Wall, Doireann Ní Ghríofa and photographer John Minihan.

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WEDNESDAY

 

Film: Frank O'Connor Self-Portrait

Frank O'Connor

23 September at 11am
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: FREE


A film in two parts recorded especially for the first week of broadcast of Telefís Eireann in 1962. Directed by Michael Johnston. Approximately 60 minutes.

 

Readings from Long Story, Short Journal
with contributors Susan Burke-Trehy & Eimear Ryan

Susan Burke-Trehy
Eimear Ryan

23 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE


Long Story, Short Journal is edited by Jennifer Matthews, featuring longer short stories of 4000 words or more. New stories are published monthly, and free to read online.

Susan Burke-Trehy is a writer and researcher with a background in film production, journalism and third-level teaching. Awards include a bursary to participate in the 2008 International Short Story Conference and an IRCHSS PhD Scholarship. Susan is completing her first novel and is working on a short story collection. She lives in Cork with her husband and four children.

Eimear Ryan’s stories have appeared in New Irish Writing, The Stinging Fly, The Dublin Review, and the anthologies Town & Country and The Long Gaze Back. Her awards include a Hennessy First Fiction Award and an Arts Council bursary. Born in Co. Tipperary, she now lives and works in Cork.

 

Readings: Deirdre Brennan & Mary Leland
in conversation with Patrick Cotter

Deirdre Brennan
Mary Leland

23 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Deirdre Brennan was born in Dublin in 1934 and brought up in Tipperary. She writes in both Irish and English, with collections that include Scothanna Geala (Coscéim, 1989), which was a Poetry Ireland Choice of the Year; Beneath Castles Of White Sail (Divas Series, Galway, Arlen House 2003); Swimming With Pelicans / Ag Eitilt Fara Condair (Arlen House 2007); Hidden Places|Scáthán Eile (Arlen House, 2011); and most recently Staying Thin for Daddy (Arlen House, 2014). She lives in Carlow.

Mary Leland is a journalist, novelist, short story auteur, non-fiction writer. As a journalist, Leland has worked at the Cork Exaimer, Irish Times and Irish Press. As a published fiction writer, Leland’s novels include The Killeen (London, Hamish Hamilton 1985), and Approaching Priests (London, Sinclair Stevenson 1991). She also published a collection of short stories entitled The Little Galloway Girls (London, Black Swan 1987). As well as making frequent contributions to the Sunday Independent, Irish Times and Sunday Tribune, Leland received second place in the Munster Literature Centre’s 2003 Sean O’Faolain short story competition. She lives in Cork.

 

Readings: Danielle McLaughlin & Thomas Morris
in conversation with Jennifer Matthews

Danielle McLaughlinThomas Morris
23 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €9

 

Danielle McLaughlin’s stories have appeared in newspapers and magazines such as The Stinging Fly, The Irish Times, The South Circular, Southword, The Penny Dreadful, Long Story, Short and The New Yorker. She has won various awards for her short fiction, including the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition 2012, The From the Well short story competition 2012, The Willesden Short Story Prize 2013, The Merriman Short Story Competition 2013 in memory of Maeve Binchy, and the Dromineer Literary Festival Short Story Competition 2013. She was shortlisted for the Writing.ie Irish Short Story of the Year category in the Irish Book Awards in 2013 and 2014, and her story ‘The Dinosaurs on Other Planets’ was shortlisted for the Davy Byrnes Award 2014. Her debut collection of short stories Dinosaurs on Other Planets will be published in Ireland by The Stinging Fly Press in autumn 2015, and in the UK (John Murray), US (Random House) and Germany (Luchterhand) in 2016.

Thomas Morris is from Caerphilly, South Wales, and has been living in Dublin since 2005. He has worked with the Lilliput Press and The Stinging Fly, where he is the fiction editor. A writer of short stories, Thomas has published fiction in The Irish Times and The Moth, and in 2012 he received a literature bursary from the Arts Council of Ireland. During 2012-13, he was enrolled on the Creative Writing Prose MA at the University of East Anglia, where he won the Malcolm Bradbury Continuation Bursary. His first collection We Don’t Know What We’re Doing has just been published by Faber.

 

 

Readings: Toby Litt & Eliza Robertson
in conversation with Doireann Ní Ghríofa

Toby LittEliza Robertson

23 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €9

 

Toby Litt grew up in Ampthill, Bedfordshire. He has worked as a teacher, bookseller and subtitler. A graduate of Malcolm Bradbury’s creative writing course at the University of East Anglia, he is the author of two books of short stories, Adventures in Capitalism and Exhibitionism, and nine novels; most recently King Death. He is a Granta Best of Young British Novelist, and won the Manchester Fiction Prize 2009 with his story ‘John and John’. He teaches at Birkbeck College.

Eliza Robertson was born in Vancouver and grew up on Vancouver Island. She attended the creative writing programs at the University of Victoria and the University of East Anglia, where she received the 2011 Man Booker Scholarship. Her stories have been shortlisted for the Journey Prize and CBC Short Story Prize. In 2013, her story "We Walked On Water" co-won the Commonwealth Short Story Prize. Her first collection, Wallflowers, came out this year with Hamish Hamilton Canada and Bloomsbury. She lives in England.

 

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THURSDAY

 

Films – Séamus Murphy: A Quiet Revolution & The Martyr


24 September at 11am
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: FREE

 

Seamus MurphySéamus Murphy: A Quiet Revolution is a film from Cork director Padraig Trehy. The Cork-born sculptor Seamus Murphy (1907-1975) was one of the foremost artists in Ireland in the middle decades of the twentieth-century. Apart from a year studying in Paris in the 1930s, Murphy spent his entire working life as an artist living in Cork City. Murphy’s struggle to survive as an artist mirrored that of the emerging nation around him. In his art and craft Murphy attempted to create work which would be distinctly Irish and would encourage others to look within the bounds of the island and not without, for inspiration. 59 minutes.

 

The MartyrThe Martyr is a TV adaption of a Frank O'Connor story, in which an IRA character played by one Ronald Reagan opens the door to a Free State officer played by Lee Marvin. (1954) Approx. 30 minutes.

 

 

 

Journal launch: Banshee
readings from the début issue

Banshee

24 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Banshee is a new journal of exciting, accessible, contemporary writing from Ireland and around the world. The journal will incorporate a variety of formats: short stories, flash fiction, poems and essays. Favourite themes include coming of age, sexuality, gender, mortality, complicated relationships of all shapes, the joys and frustrations of the creative life, our relationship with technology, and the extended adolescence of the 21st century. Banshee is edited by Laura Jane Cassidy, Claire Hennessy, and Eimear Ryan.

 

Readings: Aiden O'Reilly & Paul O'Reilly
in conversation with Cal Doyle

Aidan O'ReillyPaul O'Reilly

24 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Aiden O'Reilly has worked as a mathematics lecturer, translator, building-site worker, and property magazine editor. His fiction has appeared in The Stinging Fly, The Dublin Review, The Irish Times, Prairie Schooner, 3am magazine, and several anthologies. He won the biannual McLaverty Short Story Award in 2008. He received a bursary from the Arts Council to work on his short story collection Greetings, Hero which was published by Honest Publishing UK in September 2014.

Paul O'Reilly lives with his wife and children in Co. Wexford, Ireland. Longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, in 2015 Paul’s debut short story collection The Girl Missing from the Window was published to acclaim by Doire Press. His work has been published in the Irish Independent, the Irish TimesThe Stinging Fly, The Scaldy DetailNatural Bridge (US), the Bristol Prize Anthology (UK), online at NecessaryFiction.com (US), Writing.ie, TheJournal.ie and selected for The Lonely Voice series of readings at the Irish Writers’ Centre. An award winning Irish traditional singer, songwriter, lilter, and musician, Paul has produced and recorded on several albums, while also appearing on national radio, TV and with the Irish Chamber Orchestra.

 

 

Readings: Marie-Helene Bertino & Siddhartha Gigoo
in conversation with Jennifer Matthews

Marie-Helene BertinoSiddhartha Gigoo
24 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €9

 

 

Marie-Helene Bertino’s debut novel 2 A.M. AT THE CAT’S PAJAMAS is a Barnes & Noble Fall ’14 Discover Great New Writers pick. It is an NPR Best Book of 2014, and a Best Book of the Year at Flavorwire, Buzzfeed, Popsugar, The Kansas City Star, and others. Her collection of short stories SAFE AS HOUSES received The 2012 Iowa Short Fiction Award, judged by Jim Shepard. Marie-Helene teaches in the Creative Writing Program at NYU and in the low-residency M.F.A. program at The Institute for Indian American Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, The Center for Fiction, The Sackett Street Workshops, and the Emerging Writer’s Workshop for One Story, where she was the Associate Editor. She has worked as a biographer for people living with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

 

Siddhartha Gigoo studied English Literature at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India. He is the author of two books of fiction, The Garden of Solitude (2011) and A Fistful of Earth and Other Stories (2015). He has also written and directed two short films, The Last Day (which was selected for several international film festivals) and Goodbye, Mayfly. Two books of his poems, Fall and Other Poems and Reflections – written as a student – were published by Writer’s Workshop, Kolkata, India.

 

Readings: Kelly Link & Heather O'Neill
in conversation with Alannah Hopkin

Kelly LinkHeather O'Neill

24 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: €9

 

 

Kelly Link is the author of the collections Stranger Things Happen, Magic for Beginners, Pretty Monsters, and Get in Trouble. Her short stories have been published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, The Best American Short Stories, and Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards. She has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. She and Gavin J. Grant have co-edited a number of anthologies, including multiple volumes of The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror and, for young adults, Steampunk! and Monstrous Affections. She is the co-founder of Small Beer Press and co-edits the occasional zine Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. Link was born in Miami, Florida. She currently lives with her husband and daughter in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Heather O'Neill’s first novel, Lullabies for Little Criminals, earned accolades around the world, including being named winner of Canada Reads 2007 and the Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction, and being a finalist for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction and the Orange Prize. She published her second novel The Girl Who Was Saturday Night in 2014. It was a shortlisted nominee for the 2014 Scotiabank Giller Prize. Her short story collection Daydreams of Angels was published in 2015. She is a regular contributor to CBC Books, CBC Radio, National Public Radio, The New York Times Magazine, The Gazette (Montreal) and The Walrus. She was born in Montreal, where she currently lives.


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FRIDAY

 

Films—Writer in Profile: William Trevor,
Writer in Profile: Edna O'Brien, & BBC Monitor: Frank O'Connor

Edna O'Brien

25 September at 11am
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: FREE

 

Full program approx. 60 minutes

Writer in Profile: William Trevor. (RTE) Novelist and short-story writer William Trevor was born in Mitchelstown, County Cork, in the Republic of Ireland on 24 May 1928. William Trevor is one of the most prolific writers to have emerged from modern Ireland. He has written close to twenty novels, fifteen collections of short stories, he has produced eleven theatre plays, thirteen radio plays and over thirty-seven television scripts. In 1977 he received a CBE and has won Whitbread awards in 1976, 1983, 1994 and 1995.

Writer in Profile: Edna O'Brien. (RTE) Irish novelist and short-story writer Edna O'Brien was born on 15 December 1930 in Tuamgraney, County Clare, Ireland. Edna O'Brien is the author of The Country Girls Trilogy, The Light of Evening, Saints and Sinners, Country Girl, and other widely acclaimed books. She has lived in London for many years.

Monitor: Frank O'Connor
(BBC Monitor, 1961). Not only an insightful glimpse into O'Connor the man and writer, but also an affecting portrait of Cork city more than fifty years ago.

 

 

Seán Ó Faoláin Prize-Giving & Reading

Fiction

25 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

The Sean O’Faolain Prize awarded to the best single story entered in competition from anywhere in the world. The first prize is €2000. The winner also receives a week’s residency at the Anam Cara artist retreat in West Cork and publication of their winning story in Southword. The winner, if they choose to travel to Cork for this event, also receives accommodation with meals for the duration of the festival and entry into all events. This occasion is an opportunity to hear the winning story and the judge’s citation from Danielle McLaughlin. The competition is now closed for submissions.

 

Out of the Slushpile: craft talk by Marie-Helene Bertino

Marie-Helene Bertino

25 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Marie-Helene Bertino will be sharing personal stories about rejection. She’ll give practical advice as a writer and ex-lit mag editor on how to get out of the slush pile. Sub-topics will include: the story that was rejected 35 times before winning a Pushcart! The mistakes writers make when writing cover letters/ dealing with editors/ managing social media. How you know what a lit mag publishes without purchasing 100 subscriptions.

Marie-Helene Bertino’s debut novel 2 A.M. AT THE CAT’S PAJAMAS is a Barnes & Noble Fall ’14 Discover Great New Writers pick. It is an NPR Best Book of 2014, and a Best Book of the Year at Flavorwire, Buzzfeed, Popsugar, The Kansas City Star, and others. Her collection of short stories SAFE AS HOUSES received The 2012 Iowa Short Fiction Award, judged by Jim Shepard. Marie-Helene teaches in the Creative Writing Program at NYU and in the low-residency M.F.A. program at The Institute for Indian American Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, The Center for Fiction, The Sackett Street Workshops, and the Emerging Writer’s Workshop for One Story, where she was the Associate Editor. She has worked as a biographer for people living with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

 

The Long Gaze Back: An Anthology of Irish Women Writers
Reading by Mary Costello & Éilís Ní Dhuibhne; conversation with editor Sinéad Gleeson.

The Long Gaze BackMary CostelloÉilís Ní Dhuibhne
25 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: €9

 

This new anthology of 30 short stories features classic and contemporary women writers,  including Mary Lavin, Anne Enright, Maeve Brennan, Eimear McBride, Christine Dwyer Hickey, Lisa McInerney, Norah Hoult, Belinda McKeon and more. This event features two of the contributors and will be chaired by the anthology Editor, Sinéad Gleeson.

Mary Costello, originally from Galway, lives in Dublin. Her first book, a collection of short stories entitled The China Factory, was nominated for the 2012 Guardian First Book Award. Her novel, Academy Street, was named Irish Book of the Year 2014 and was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award.

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne was born in Dublin in 1954 and is a graduate of UCD. For the past five years she has taught Creative Writing on the MA in Creative Writing in University College Dublin.  She has written over 24 books, including  novels, collections of short stories, several books for children, plays and non-fiction works. She writes in both Irish and English. She has won The Bisto Book of the Year Award, the Readers' Association of Ireland Award, the Stewart Parker Award for Drama, the Butler Award for Prose from the Irish American Cultural Institute and several Oireachtas awards for novels and plays in Irish. The novel The Dancers Dancing was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her stories are widely anthologized and translated. Her latest collection of short stories, The Shelter of Neighbours, was published in 2012. She was elected to Aosdána, the Irish Association of Artists, in 2004.

Sinéad Gleeson is a freelance broadcaster and journalist. She currently presents The Book Show on RTE Radio One and is a reporter on the RTE Television arts show, The Works. She reviews books and writes arts features and interviews for The Irish Times, and is a regular critic on RTE Radio One’s Arena.  In the past she has written and reviewed for The Guardian, The Sunday Times, The Sunday Business Post, The Irish Independent, The Herald and Image Magazine.

 

Segun Afolabi & Ann Pancake
in conversation with Patrick Cotter

Segun AfolabiAnn Pancake

24 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: €9

 

Segun Afolabi was born in Nigeria and brought up in the Congo, Canada and Japan. His stories have been published in various literary journals including Granta, the London Magazine, Wasafiri and the Edinburgh Review. He lives and works in London. He was awarded the Caine Prize for African Writing 2005 for his short story, 'Monday Morning', and shortlisted in 2015. His collection of stories, A Life Elsewhere, including the prize-winning story, was published by Cape in 2006. Afolabi's novel, Goodbye Lucille, was published by Cape in 2007.

Ann Pancake grew up in Romney and Summersville, West Virginia. Her new short story collection, Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley, was published by Counterpoint Press in February 2015. Pancake's collection of short stories, Given Ground, won the 2000 Bakeless award, and she has also received a Whiting Award, an NEA Grant, a Pushcart Prize, and creative writing fellowships from the states of Washington, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. Her fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies like The Georgia ReviewPoets and WritersNarrative, and New Stories from the South. She earned her BA in English at West Virginia University and a PhD. in English Literature from the University of Washington. She now lives in Seattle and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University. 

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SATURDAY

 

Panel Discussion: What Do Editors Want?

Flash Fiction

26 September at 2.15pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €9

 

A discussion on editorial taste and practice moderated by Eibhear Walshe, with panelists Kelly Link, Ladette Randolph, and Jen Hamilton-Emery

Eibhear Walshe, director of Creative Writing at the School of English, University College Cork interviews three prominent editors on what book and magazine editors are looking for in a short story writer.

Kelly Link is the author of the collections Stranger Things Happen, Magic for Beginners, Pretty Monsters, and Get in Trouble. Her short stories have been published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, The Best American Short Stories, and Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards. She has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. She and Gavin J. Grant have co-edited a number of anthologies, including multiple volumes of The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror and, for young adults, Steampunk! and Monstrous Affections. She is the co-founder of Small Beer Press and co-edits the occasional zine Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. Link was born in Miami, Florida. She currently lives with her husband and daughter in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Ladette Randolph is editor-in-chief of the journal Ploughshares. She is the author of four books: two novels: Haven’s Wake and A Sandhills Ballad, the short story collection This is Not the Tropics, and the memoir Leaving the Pink House. In addition, she has edited four anthologies: A Different Plain, The Big Empty, and two volumes of the Ploughshares Solos Omnibus.

Jen Hamilton-Emery is editor and director of indie publisher Salt, home of the annual Best British Short Stories series, and Frank O’Connor prize winner, Carys Davies. Jen grew up in Glasgow and now lives by the coast in Norfolk. She claims to have the best job in the world.

 

 

Kirsty Gunn & Claire Keegan

Kirsty GunnClaire Keegan

26 September at 4.15pm
Triskel (Christchurch)
Admission: €9

 

Kirsty Gunn published her first novel with Faber in 1994 and since then has written five works of fiction and three short story collections. Translated in over twelve territories, and widely anthologised, her books have been broadcast, turned into film and dance theatre, and are the recipient of various prizes and awards, including Scottish Book of the Year 1997. A regular contributor to a range of international newspapers and magazines, she is also Professor of Writing Practice and Study at the University of Dundee, where she established and directs the writing programme. She lives in London and Scotland with her husband and two daughters. Her latest work is a collection of short stories, Infidelities Faber and Faber, which has won the 2015 Edge Hill Prize and was shortlisted for the Frank O'Connor Award.

Claire Keegan was born in 1968 and grew up on a farm in Wicklow. Her first collection of short stories, Antarctica, was completed in 1998. It announced her as an exceptionally gifted and versatile writer of contemporary fiction and was awarded the Rooney Prize for Literature. Her second short story collection, Walk the Blue Fields, was published to enormous critical acclaim in 2007 and won her the 2008 Edge Hill Prize for Short Stories. Winner of the Davy Byrnes Memorial Prize, her long short story, Foster is now published in a revised and expanded version by Faber and Faber. Claire Keegan lives in County Wexford, Ireland.

 

 

Frank O'Connor Short Story Award prizegiving & reading by 2015 laureate Carys Davies

Carys Davies

26 September at 8.15pm
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: €9

 

Carys Davies was born in Wales and now lives in Lancaster. She has published two collections of stories with Salt Some New Ambush (2007) and The Redemption of Galen Pike which has won this year’s Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Among her other honours she has received the V.S. Pritchett Memorial Prize, the Olive Cook Short Story Award and a Northern Writers’ Award.

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