About the authors:

 

 

Literary Readings

Tickets available for purchase before evening events at the Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street.

 

Download festival brochure including timetable & map. (4.50MB)

 

Go to events on: Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday * Sunday

 

 

WEDNESDAY

 

 

Bloodlines by Joyce Russell: book launch by a new Cork writer

Bloodlines by Joyce RussellJoyce Russell

Wednesday, 19 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

We are pleased to host the launch of a new collection of stories by a Cork writer and from a Cork publisher.

Joyce Russell is a journalist and writer. Born in England she settled in West Cork more than thirty years ago and started writing short stories a decade ago. Her stories have won many prizes including the RTÉ Francis MacManus Short Story Award, the Séan Ó Faoláin Short Story Prize, the START Chapbook Prize and the Real Writers Short Story Award. Stories have been included in several anthologies and have been broadcast on radio. Bloodlines is her first published short story collection and is published by the Mercier Press.

 

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Siobhán Parkinson: reading & interview for young people

Siobhán Parkinson at the Cork International Short Story FestivalSiobhán Parkinson reading at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Wednesday, 19 September at 3pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

Siobhán Parkinson was Ireland’s inaugural children’s laureate, Laureate na nÓg. She writes fiction for children and young people (and occasionally for adults). She has published more than twenty books since 1992, and her work has been translated into as many languages. She has won the Bisto Book of the Year award, she has received Bisto Merit and Honour Book awards four times, as well as two IBBY Honours and several White Ravens. Most recently she won an Oireachtas award. She is is currently commissioning editor and publisher with Little Island.

 

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John F. Deane & Christine Dwyer Hickey: readings and discussion

Christine Dwyer Hickey at the Cork International Short Story FestivalJohn F Deane at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Wednesday, 19 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs. Tickets at the door.


John F. Deane founded Poetry Ireland - the National Poetry Society - and The Poetry Ireland Review of which he is currently editor. He has published several collections of poetry and three novels with Blackstaff Press. With the Blackstaff Press he has also published several collections of short stories, notably The Coffin Master and Other Stories (2000) and most recently The Heather Fields and Other Stories (2007). Some of his fiction has been translated into German and published in that country and several collections have also been published in India.

“Deane is a brave writer and one of the finest living Irish storytellers” – The Times

Christine Dwyer Hickey is an award-winning novelist and short story writer. Twice winner of the Listowel Writers’ Week short story competition she has also been a prize-winner in the prestigious Observer/Penguin short story competition. She is the author of the Dublin Trilogy, The Dancer, The Gambler and the Gatemaker (1995-2000) which spans three generations of a Dublin family from 1913-1956. Her bestselling novel Tatty was chosen as one of the 50 Irish Books of the Decade, longlisted for the Orange Prize and shortlisted for the Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year Award. Her novel Last Train from Liguria was also a bestseller (Atlantic Books UK) and was nominated for the Prix L’Européen de Littérature. Her latest novel The Cold Eye of Heaven (Atlantic Books UK) has already received wide critical acclaim. She was shortlisted for the Hughes & Hughes Irish Book of the Year, 2011 and won the Irish Kerry Group Book of the Year in June 2012.     

“Hesitatingly wise... moving and persuasive.” Joseph O’Connor The Guardian

 

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Joe Dunthorne & Mike McCormack: readings and discussion

Mike McCormack at the Cork International Short Story Festival Joe Dunthorne at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Wednesday, 19 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs. Tickets at the door.

 

 

Joe Dunthorne was born and brought up in Cork’s sister city, Swansea. His debut novel, Submarine, was translated into fifteen languages and adapted into an award-winning film. He was shortlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award and has been a judge for the BBC National Short Story Award. His second novel, Wild Abandon, is out now.

“It is 60 years since JD Salinger invented teenage anxiety. The voice of the fragile Glass family and Holden Caulfield - damaged, precocious, confessional, self-obsessed, wearing irony against the emptiness of things - persists as about the most influential rhetoric of our lives: you can't imagine Morrissey or MySpace without it. It is, therefore, remarkable how much genuine life and surprise Joe Dunthorne brings to it in his perfectly pitched debut novel Submarine.” The Guardian

Mike McCormack was born in 1965 and comes from the West of Ireland. He is author of the novels Crowe’s Requiem and Notes from a Coma, the latter shortlisted for Irish Novel of the Year. His two collections of short stories are Getting it in the Head (Cape, 1996) and Forensic Songs which has just been published by Lilliput Press.

“Gives Ian McEwan and Edgar Allan Poe a run for their money ... The Irish short story is thriving and in the hands of writers like Mike McCormack it can only continue to.” Independent (London)

 

 

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THURSDAY

 

 

Witi Ihimaera: reading & interview for young people

Witi Ihimaera at the Cork International Short Story FestivalWiti Ihimaera at the Cork International Short Story Festival
Thursday, 20 September at 3pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

Witi Ihimaera is a New Zealand author of Māori and Anglo-Saxon descent. Ihimaera was the first Māori writer to publish both a book of short stories and a novel and most of his work consists of these genres. As a world leader in indigenous and Pacific literature, he has written a considerable number of books, with many notable works such as Tangi, Pounamu, Bulibasha and The Whale Rider (the last of which became a successful film of the same name). His stories generally portray Māori culture in modern New Zealand and his work often focuses on problems within contemporary Māori and New Zealand society.

 

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Flash Fiction readings by Tania Hershman & Nick Parker

Nick Parker at the Cork International Short Story FestivalTania Hershman at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Thursday, 20 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

Tania Hershman’s first collection of short stories and flash fiction, The White Road and Other Stories (Salt, 2008), was commended in the 2009 Orange Award for New Writers. Her second collection, consisting of 55 very short fictions, My Mother Was an Upright Piano: Fictions, was recently published by Tangent Books. She is currently writer-in-residence in the Science Faculty at Bristol University, working on a new collection of biology-inspired stories, funded by an Arts Council England grant. She is also founder and editor of The Short Review, an online journal which reviews short story collections and interviews their authors. She has been a fiction editor of Southword Online and a former judge of the Séan Ó Faoláin Short Story Competition.

By night, Nick Parker writes tiny tales, at an excruciatingly slow pace. They frequently turn up in anthologies and on the radio. His first collection, The Exploding Boy and other tiny tales (2011) was the first self-published fiction book ever to be reviewed by The Guardian. They said it was 'astonishing ... proof that the short story remains a public good'. By day he is creative director of the language consultancy The Writer. Ages ago he wrote a book all about toast, which Waterstone's described as a 'cult hit'. Before that, he was a cartoonist for Viz. He lives on the outskirts of town.

 

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Nuala Ní Chonchúir & D.W. Wilson: readings and discussion

D.W. Wilson at the Cork International Short Story FestivalNuala Ní Chonchúir at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Thursday, 20 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs. Tickets at the door.

 

 

 

Nuala Ní Chonchúir was born in Dublin in 1970 and lives in Galway; she is a short story writer, novelist and poet. Her fourth short story collection Mother America and other stories was published this year. She has won many short fiction awards including The Jane Geske Award (USA) RTÉ radio’s Francis MacManus Award, the Cúirt New Writing Prize, the inaugural Jonathan Swift Award and the Cecil Day Lewis Award. She was shortlisted for the European Prize for Literature. She has also published You, a novel and several poetry collections. www.nualanichonchuir.com


D.W. Wilson was born and raised in British Columbia. He is the recipient of the University of East Anglia’s inaugural Man Booker Prize Scholarship. His stories have appeared in literary magazines across Britain, Canada and Ireland (including Southword). ‘The Dead Roads’ won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2011. His first collection of stories Once you Break a Knuckle has been published on both sides of the Atlantic this year. Wilson’s stories reveal to us how our best intentions can be doomed to fail or injure, how our loves can fall short or mislead us, how even friendship can be something dangerously temporary.

“ ‘The Dead Roads’ was the stand-out winner of the 2011 BBC Short Story Award. My worry was that it might also be the stand-out story in this debut collection, but no – the standard is consistently, astonishingly high throughout.” – Geoff Dyer

 

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Witi Ihimaera & Lysley Tenorio: readings and discussion

Lysely Tenorio at the Cork International Short Story FestivalWiti Ihimaera at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Thursday, 20 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs. Tickets at the door.


 

Witi Ihimaera is a multi-award-winning novelist descended from various tribes of New Zealand’s North Island. His first book, Pounamu Pounamu, a collection of stories, was followed by Tangi in 1973, which was the first novel by a Māori writer to be published. He is the author of thirteen novels, six collections of short stories and he has edited and compiled some highly regarded anthologies and works of non-fiction. His 1987 novel, The Whale Rider, was made into an internationally acclaimed film in 2002. His stories generally portray Māori culture in modern New Zealand and his work often focuses on problems within contemporary Māori and New Zealand society.

Pounamu Pounamu changed the face of literature in Aotearoa New Zealand, paving the way for what would later be known as the Māori Renaissance, an unprecedented flowering and recognition of Māori arts and literature in the 1970s … The book long ago achieved the status of a platinum bestseller (determined when a book has sold more than 50,000 copies in New Zealand), as have other subsequent books of Witi’s.” – Fiona Kidman.

Lysley Tenorio is the author of the story collection, Monstress, published by Ecco/HarperCollins. His stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Zoetrope: All-Story, Ploughshares, Manoa, The Chicago Tribune, and The Best New American Voices and Pushcart Prize anthologies.  A former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, he is a recipient of a Whiting Writer’s Award, the Nelson Algren Award for Short Fiction, a National Magazine Award nomination, and has received many other fellowships. Born in the Philippines, he currently lives in San Francisco, and teaches at Saint Mary’s College of California. Monstress introduces a bold new writer who explores the clash and meld of disparate cultures. Tenorio reveals the lives of people on the outside looking in with rare skill, humour and deep understanding.

“Tenorio’s characters walk tightropes strung between the Philippines and America, between illusions and reality, between family ties and the need to strike out alone. Monstress is a wonderful read: poignant, imaginative, somehow sad and funny all at once.” – Anthony Doerr

 

 

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FRIDAY

 

 

Kevin Stevens: reading & interview for young people

Kevin Stevens at the Cork International Short Story FestivalKevin Stevens at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Friday, 21 September at 3pm.
The Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 


Kevin Stevens is the author of six books, including This Ain’t No Video Game, Kid!, a novel for young adults, and two novels for adults. He is also a consultant editor for Little Island, responsible for helping in the development of two series of illustrated stories for children.

 

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Johanna Skibsrud & Stephanie Powell Watts: readings and discussion

Stephanie Powell Watts at the Cork International Short Story FestivalJohanna Skibsrud at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Friday, 21 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

Johanna Skibsrud is the author of the short fiction collection, This Will Be Difficult to Explain and Other Stories (Hamish Hamilton Canada 2011/ William Heinemann 2012), the 2010 Giller Prize winning novel, The Sentimentalists (William Heinemann 2011), recently short-listed for the Commonwealth Book Prize, and two collections of poetry, Late Nights With Wild Cowboys (Gaspereau 2008) and I Do Not Think That I Could Love A Human Being (Gaspereau 2010). Originally from Nova Scotia, Canada, Johanna currently lives in Tucson, Arizona where she is working on a second novel.

This Will Be Difficult To Explain And Other Stories is every bit as wise, poetic and probing as The Sentimentalists. Characters find themselves embedded in great – often tragically comic – misunderstandings, grappling to communicate with each other while fighting through the fog of their limited perspectives.  – Now (Toronto)

Stephanie Powell Watts is an associate professor at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA. Her debut short story collection We Are Taking Only What We Need was published earlier this year by BkMk Press of the University of Missouri-Kansas City and has been a 2012 PEN / Hemingway finalist, a Chautauqua award finalist, a finalist for the John Gardner Ficiton Book Award, a ForeWord Reviews finalist and a USA BookNews finalist. Her short fiction has appeared in a number of journals and anthologies including the 2008 Pushcart Prize anthology and the 2007 and 2009 editions of the New Stories from the South.

“In a strong debut Watts chronicles in ten stories the lives of black North Carolinians who come from or lived near ‘dark houses on tangled dirt roads on the fringes of the county.’ The kind of love found in the Carolina Hills – and in these stories – demands tribute.” – Publishers Weekly

 

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Zsuzsi Gartner & Sarah Hall: readings and discussion

Sarah Hall at the Cork International Short Story FestivalZsuzsi Gartner at the Cork International Short Story FestivalFriday, 21 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

 


Zsuzsi Gartner is the author of the short fiction collections Better Living Through Plastic Explosives and All the Anxious Girls on Earth, the editor of Darwin’s Bastards: Astounding Tales from Tomorrow, and the creative director of Vancouver Review’s Blueprint BC Fiction Series. Her stories have been widely anthologized, and broadcast on CBC and NPR’s Selected Shorts. She has received numerous nominations and awards for her magazine journalism, and a 2007 National Magazine Award for fiction. She has been on faculty for the Banff Centre’s Literary Arts Programs and is an adjunct faculty member for UBC’s Optional Residency MFA in Creative Writing. Zsuzsi lives in Vancouver.

“Zsuzsi Gartner is a brilliant, mind-expanding writer, the kind who sneaks up on you with her darkness, her wit, her imagination, her humour, her political savvy.” The Globe and Mail

“ Zsuzsi Gartner’s writing is dazzling, effortless and clear as a bell. She’s able to crystallize a cultural moment in a way entirely her own that is both instantaneous and eternal.” – Douglas Coupland



Sarah Hall was born in Cumbria in 1974. She is the author of four novels, Haweswater, The Electric Michelangelo, The Carhullan Army and How to Paint a Dead Man, and the winner of, amongst others, the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the Betty Trask Award, the John Llewellyn Ryhs Prize and the Portico Prize for Fiction. The Electric Michelangelo was also shortlisted for the Booker Prize and longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction.

“Monstrous events happen offstage over the course of these seven stories: beatings, maulings, suicide and abandonment. But their force is felt all the more powerfully through the measured precision of Hall's prose, which is always grounded in the exact immediacy of everyday detail.” The Guardian

“Balancing muscularity with achingly beautiful prose, these stories are dark, raw and heartbreaking. An immensely satisfying and haunting collection.” – Clare Wigfall

 

 

Cork Culture Night: Flash Fiction Rapid Fire Reading

Flash Fiction Slam at the Cork International Short Story FestivalFriday, 21 September at 11pm.
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: FREE. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

 

In celebration of National Culture Night – a free event consisting of rapid fire readings by a selection of festival authors and specially invited others. Also taking part will be five authors drawn from the Flash Fiction Festival Workshop who will have the opportunity to compete for the Farmgate Cafe €200 Flash Fiction Award. Listen to humour, tragedy and sometimes sheer weirdness. Each story will be less than 500 words long so feel free to stay until midnight or come and go as you please.

 

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SATURDAY

 

 

My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Contemporary Fairytales with Kate Bernheimer & Ilya Kaminsky
readings & discussion

Kate Bernheimer at the Cork International Short Story FestivalReadings from My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Saturday, 22 September at 2.30 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

Neil Gaiman, Michael Cunningham, Neil Labute, Joyce Carol Oates and more than thirty other extraordinary writers celebrate fairy tales in this thrilling volume—the ultimate literary costume party. Spinning houses and talking birds. Whispered secrets and borrowed hope. Here are new stories sewn from old skins, gathered from around the world by visionary author and editor Kate Bernheimer and inspired by everything from Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" and "The Little Match Girl" to Charles Perrault's "Bluebeard" and "Cinderella" to the Brothers Grimm's "Hansel and Gretel" and "Rumpelstiltskin" to fairy tales by Goethe and Calvino. Fairy tales are our oldest literary tradition, and yet they chart the imaginative frontiers of the twenty-first century as powerfully as they evoke our earliest encounters with literature. This exhilarating collection restores their place in the literary canon.

“I cannot remember a time I had more fun reading a book! Many of these contemporary tales rival the originals in creepiness, joy, and impact.” – Darcey Steinke

In this event emeritus professor of folklore Gearóid Ó Crualaoich leads editor/contributor Kate Bernheimer and contributor Ilya Kaminsky on a discussion of the place of the fairytale in adult reading in the 21st Century. There will be readings from the book and a chance for questions from the floor.

 

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Kevin Barry & Will Boast: readings and discussion

Will Boast to read at the Cork International Short Story FestivalKevin Barry

Saturday, 22 September at 4.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

Kevin Barry is the author of the story collections Dark Lies The Island and There Are Little Kingdoms and the novel City Of Bohane. He recently won the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Prize. He has also been awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature and was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Prize and the Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year. His stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Best European Fiction, the Granta Book of the Irish Short Story and many other journals and anthologies. His plays have been performed in Ireland and the US. He also works on screenplays, essays, and graphic stories. He lives in County Sligo.

 

Will Boast was born in England and grew up in Ireland and Wisconsin and currently lives in San Francisco. His story collection, Power Ballads, won the 2011 Iowa Short Fiction Award. His fiction and essays have appeared in Best New American Voices, Narrative, Salon, Glimmer Train, The American Scholar, and The New York Times, among other publications. He's been a Stegner Fellow in fiction at Stanford University and a Charles Pick Fellow at the University of East Anglia. He’s currently working on both a novel and a memoir.
Power Ballads is not only a deeply felt look at the lives of musicians but also an exploration of the secret music that plays inside us all.

“Reading the stories in Power Ballads is like getting to know a new band: the lyrics get to you when you feel the least prepared and you laugh and cry and hope to find someone who laughs and cries with you. Will Boast is an exciting new voice.” – Yiyun Li

 

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Roshi Fernando & Éilís Ní Dhuibhne: readings and discussion

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne at the Cork International Short Story FestivalRoshini Fernando

Saturday, 22 September at 7.15 PM Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

We regret to report that, due to personal reasons, Fiona Kidman will be unable to attend the Cork International Short Story Festival as had been previously planned.

Roshi Fernando’s Homesick, linked stories about the Sri Lankan community in London, was short listed for the Sunday Times/EFG Short Story Award 2011 and won the 2009 Impress Prize for New Writers. She’ll be reading at the Small Wonder Festival in the UK as well this month, and has been previously longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. She was born and brought up in London. She was educated at the University of Warwick and is in the final year of a PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Swansea. Her story Three Cuts is published in the anthology Sing Sorrow Sorrow published by Seren in October 2010. Roshi has also been given a special commendation by the judges of the Manchester Fiction Prize, and has been longlisted for the Bridport Prize 2009. Roshi lives in Gloucestershire with her partner and four children.

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne was born in Dublin and is a graduate of UCD. She has PhD in Irish Folklore and her interest in folklore informs much of her own writing. She worked for many years as a librarian and now teaches creative writing at Trinity College Dublin and for the Faber Writing Academy. She has published more than twenty books, including six collections of short stories. She writes in Irish and English, for adults and children. Her stories are widely translated and anthologized, most recently in the Granta Book of the Irish Short Story and in Best European Fiction 2011. Her latest collection of short stories, The Shelter of Neighbours (Blackstaff Press), was published in March 2012. She has been the recipient of many awards including the Stuart Parker Award, three Bisto Awards and several Oireachtas awards.

 “Fiction, graced with head-versus-heart knowingness, about people on whom Ireland imposes timid choices and straitened lives.” – The New York Times

“Her prose shimmers like poetry.” – Edna O’Brien, The Observer

 

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John Banville & Lydia Davis: readings and discussion

Lydia Davis at the Cork International Short Story FestivalJohn Banville at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Saturday, 22 September at 9.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€15/€13 concs. Tickets at the door.


John Banville was born in Wexford in Ireland in 1945. Regarded as the most stylistically elaborate Irish writer of his generation, John Banville is a philosophical novelist concerned with the nature of perception, the conflict between imagination and reality, and the existential isolation of the individual. He has published one short story collection Long Lankin. His latest novel is entitled Ancient Light. He has been a recipient of the Booker Prize, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the Guardian Fiction Prize, the Premio Nonino and the Franz Kafka Prize. He is sometimes mistaken for the novelist Benjamin Black.

Lydia Davis is an American story writer, novelist, and translator. She is the author of six collections of stories and one novel, The End of the Story and most recently The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis. She is also the translator of numerous works of avant-garde French literature, including fiction by Maurice Blanchot and the autobiographical essays of Michel Leiris, as well as the Penguin Classic  Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust (Penguin UK, 2002) and Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (Penguin UK, 2010). Among many other honours, she was named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government in 1999 and was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2003. She currently teaches at SUNY Albany and New York University.

 

 

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SUNDAY

 

 

Presentation of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award and the Seán Ó Faoláin Prize, followed by a reading by 2012 O'Connor Laureate: Nathan Englander

Yiyun LiHaruki Murakami winner of 2006 Frank O'Connor AwardMiranda July: 2007 Winner of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story AwardJhumpa Lahiri: 2008 Winner of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story AwardSimon Van Booy: 2009 winner of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story AwardRon Rash: Winner of the 2010 Frank O'Connor International Short Story AwardEdna O'Brien

Sunday, 23 September at 7.30pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin Street, Cork
€10/€8 concs. Tickets at the door.

 

First presented in 2005 when Cork City was European Capital of Culture the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award remains, at €25,000, the world’s most lucrative award for a collection of short stories. By the calibre of its past winners including Yiyun Li, Haruki Murakami, Miranda July, Jhumpa Lahiri, Simon Van Booy, Ron Rash and Edna O’Brien it has also established itself as the world’s most prestigious international short story award. Established and presented by the Munster Literature Centre it is generously funded by Cork City Council. This year’s judges include the poet James Harpur, the novelist Mary Leland and the literary programmer Ann Luttrell.

The Sean O’Faolain Prize is worth €2,000 and is presented each year to the best single short story under 3,000 words entered in competition. This year’s judge has been Ian Wild and at time of going to press the winner is unknown.


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